Butter & Scotch Hot Toddy Caramel Corn

 

Butter & Scotch Hot Toddy Caramel Corn

 

This is a sponsored post from Abrams Books and the Abrams Dinner Party. 

 

Last week I did a very informal poll in a video I made for Instagram about this great new cookbook called Butter & Scotch, named for the actual Brooklyn bar and bakery. I asked my viewers which recipe they would like to see on my blog and gave them three choices.

The overwhelming choice was for this Hot Toddy Caramel Corn, made with a good shot of bourbon!

That is what this book and the establishment is Brooklyn is all about. Delicious baked goods and really fantastic cocktails, both meant to be eaten and drank together! Forget salty bar foods, this is all about balancing a sweet dessert with a cocktail that may also be sweet or bitter or both!

This book covers the bases, from pie dough to frosting to cakes and beyond. On the cocktail side, there are recipes for simple syrups and shrubs for making drinks that are out of this world.

I grew up drinking Hot Toddys when I was sick, and to this day I make them when my throat is sore and my nose is stuffy. But now I can make Hot Toddy Caramel Corn, and enjoy it while I sip my liquid Hot Toddy.

Whether I’m sick or not.

Hot Toddy Caramel Corn

Servings 14 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup clover honey
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3 tablespoon bourbon
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 14 cups popped popcorn

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325° F. Grease two rimmed metal baking sheets and set aside.

  2. In a large heavy-bottomed pot, heat the sugar, butter and honey over medium-high, stirring until they are well incorporated. Cook the caramel until you smell the caramelized sugar and see it turn a light amber/beige color.

  3. Remove the pot from the heat and whisk in the baking soda, then whisk in the bourbon, salt, lemon zest and cinnamon. (be careful, the caramel will release a lot of steam, so guard your hands.)

  4. When all the ingredients are incorporated, fold in the popcorn using a heatproof spatula or wooden spoon. Keep folding, pulling caramel up from the bottom and over the popcorn, until it is well coated.

  5. Spread the popcorn out on the baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes, pulling it out every 5 minutes to fold and toss to better coat the popcorn with caramel.  Remove from the oven and let cool completely (this takes about 20 minutes) then serve or seal in airtight bags.

  6. The caramel corn will last up to 5 weeks when kept in an air-tight bag away from humidity.

Full Disclosure: This is a sponsored post from Abrams Books and the Abrams Dinner Party.  I may receive compensation in the form of monetary compensation or product compensation in exchange for my review. I believe in reviewing only products that fit my brand and will be beneficial to my readers. All the opinions are my own.

The 24-Hour Wine Expert

24HourWineExpert

I like to consider myself a wine aficionado, although I am probably closer to being a wino. . . I mean a wine lover.

While I was in culinary school, one of my favorite classes was an intensive wine course we were required to take. This class was a combination of lectures, tastings and wine pairings.  My school was located in San Francisco, so we were able to take field trips to the Napa and Sonoma Valley for tastings and meetings with local wine makers. Although I enjoyed wine before, I had no real understanding of wine. This class opened my eyes, and my palate.

In California, you can find great wine being made from the Mexican border all the way up to the Oregon border. I have been to wineries all over this state, and learned through tasting what my favorite wines are. But, while California has many varietals to choose from, the reality is that wine is produced all over the world and has been since biblical times. And learning about wines from other countries can be daunting, especially if you aren’t required to take a class, as I was.

That is where The 24-Hour Wine Expert written by renowned wine critic Jancis Robinson comes in. This pocket-size book makes choosing the right wine so simple, even if you are a wine novice.  This book is written for everyone, with no wine snobbery or language that is not accessible.

About the same size as a Kindle or other tablet, this book easily fits in your purse or bag, so taking it with you when you go wine shopping is easy.

Are you having a dinner party? Consult the chapter about Matching Wine to the Occasion.

Don’t know a thing about European wines? Read Wine Regions You Need to Know About – A Cheat Sheet.

Not sure how to store and serve your wines? How to Handle Wine and Essential Hardware are the chapters you need.

From learning about each grape variety to choosing the right bottle, The 24-Hour Wine Expert breaks it all down for you in an unfettered, simple to understand style.

To learn even more about wine and Jancis Robinson, visit her website, where you can find articles, tasting notes and more.

Find links to purchase The 24-Hour Wine Expert here.

 

Full Disclosure: This is a sponsored post from Abrams Books and the Abrams Dinner Party.  I may receive compensation in the form of monetary compensation or product compensation in exchange for my review. I believe in reviewing only products that fit my brand and will be beneficial to my readers. All the opinions are my own.

The Dairy Good Cookbook

Dairy Good CookbookPeople who have know me for a long time know that I have a love for cows. In my home you will find cow bowls with little pink udders for the feet, a cow cookie jar, cow salt and peppers shakers. You get the idea.I’ve always loved their big eyes and gentle nature, but wasn’t a collector of cow items until one fateful day. While talking with my friend Victoria, she called me “mujer,” which is woman in spanish. I heard the word “Moo-head,” which prompted me to say “Don’t be calling me a cow!” After laughing at me for an eternity, Victoria explained she said mujer not moo-head. Since then I have received cow themed gifts from both Victoria and her sister Rebecca. And I buy them for my cow collection, which is always growing.
At the county fair, one of the first places I head to is the nursery barn, hoping to see those cute little baby cows! Last year my daughter and I almost got to see a calf being born, but missed it by a few minutes. Mama was in very active labor when we arrived, but just like we human mamas, we have that baby when that baby is ready to be had! We checked back in a few hours and there on the straw was a skinny little calf resting from its journey into this world.
I am working with DairyGood.Org, a website where you can find all things dairy. They have just released a brand new cookbook, The Dairy Good Cookbook: Everyday Comfort Food from America’s Dairy Farm Families. This is the first book from dairy farmers and those who bring dairy products from around the world to your table to share wholesome dairy ingredients.
This book features more than 100 recipes that showcase the unique tastes and versatility of dairy – from cheese and yogurt to milk and butter. The book celebrates the nation’s more than 47,000 dairy farm families and their contributions to our American life.
As I read the profiles of the dairy farmers included in this book, what struck me most was that they were almost all multi-generational family farms. The children help out by doing chores around the farm. Some of the children have returned to the farm after having other careers in the city. One farm, which was started in 1875 in the countryside, now is next door to the city of Milwaukee, which has expanded in the 140 years the farm has been in operation.

In Moreno Valley, CA, about 1 1/2 hours from my home, is the farm of Brad and Sally Scott. California is in an epic drought period, but the Scott farm has learned to work around that. They use treated wastewater and rainwater to irrigate their crops. They grow 70% of the food the herd of 1,100 Holstein cows need. And they generate their own electricity with solar panels mounted of the feed shed. This century old farm is almost completely self-sufficient.

 

Scott Family Dairy Farm
Photo courtesy of Peter Krumhart and Dean Tanner

 

There are so many delicious recipes compiled in this cookbook from the dairy farmers themselves. One recipe I will be making soon is the Pumpkin Date Stack Cake with Mascarpone Frosting. Pumpkin puree is available year round, so I don’t think I will wait until fall to make it!

Dairy Good Pumpkin Mascarpone Cake

 

Pumpkin Date Stack Cake with Mascarpone Frosting
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 12 - 16 servings
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup unsalted butter + more for pans
  • 2 cups cake flour + more for pans
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1½ cups granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons molasses
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup pitted chopped dates
  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 4 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 2½ cups powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese, room temperature
  • chopped pitted dates for garnish
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F.
  2. Butter and flour three 8-inch round cake pans.
  3. In a medium bowl, sift the cake flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and salt.
  4. With an electric mixer, beat the butter and granulated sugar on medium speed for 3 minutes, or until light and fluffy.
  5. Add the molasses, blend thoroughly.
  6. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well between each egg.
  7. In a medium bowl mix the pumpkin, buttermilk and vanilla.
  8. Alternately add the dry ingredients and pumpkin mixture to the butter mixture in three additions, beating on low speed after each addition until combined.
  9. Stir in the dates.
  10. Divide the batter between the prepared pans.
  11. Bake the cakes for 30 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the cake comes out clean.
  12. Place the cakes on a wire and cool for 10 minutes.
  13. Remove the cakes from the pans and cool completely.
  14. With an electric mixer beat the cream cheese and butter on medium speed, until smooth and creamy.
  15. Add the powdered sugar to the mixture slowly.
  16. Add the vanilla extract, mix well.
  17. Add the mascarpone cheese and beat until smooth.
  18. Place one cooled cake layer on a serving plate.
  19. Spread one third of the frosting on top.
  20. Repeat with the remaining layers.
  21. Chill for at least one hour.
  22. Garnish the cake with chopped dates before serving.

 

 

The Dairy Good Cookbook: Everyday Comfort Food from America’s Dairy Farm Families is available nationwide wherever books are sold or you can purchase online using the links below. And visit DairyGood.org to learn more about the goodness of dairy foods and the farmers who bring them to us.

Amazon

 Barnes and Noble

 Indie Bound

 

Last but not least,  there is a giveaway!

Though the Dairy Good Cookbook, dairy farmers share their secret (and not so secret) stories, traditions, and family recipes that have been passed down through generations. For a chance to win a copy of the Dairy Good Cookbook and a $75 gift card, share a dairy recipe or dish (made with milk, cheese and/or yogurt) with a story of how it’s passed down through the generations in your family, or is tied to a special tradition or occasion meaningful to you.

 

Learn even more about Dairy Good on social media.

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Pinterest

 

This article is sponsored by Dairy Good. All opinions and text are my own.

Entry Instructions:

You may receive (1) total entry by selecting from the following entry methods:

1. Leave a comment in response to the sweepstakes prompt on this post

2. Tweet (public message) about this promotion; including exactly the following unique term in your tweet message: “#SweepstakesEntry”; and leave the URL to that tweet in a comment on this post

3. Blog about this promotion, including a disclosure that you are receiving a sweepstakes entry in exchange for writing the blog post, and leave the URL to that post in a comment on this post

4. For those with no Twitter or blog, read the official rules to learn about an alternate form of entry.

This giveaway is open to US Residents age 18 or older (or nineteen (19) years of age or older in Alabama and Nebraska). Winners will be selected via random draw, and will be notified by e-mail. The notification email will come directly from BlogHer via the sweeps@blogher email address. You will have 2 business days to respond; otherwise a new winner will be selected.

The Official Rules are available here.

This sweepstakes runs from 6/2/2015 – 6/30/2015

Be sure to visit The Dairy Good Cookbook’s brand page on BlogHer.com where you can read other bloggers’ posts!

Tea Time with Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

This post is sponsored by Nestle Toll House

 

Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

Before the technological world took over, kids often played in an imaginary world. A world where you had tea parties with all your favorite stuffed animals or battled the evil dragon with swords made from sticks. Using Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough, my daughter was able to plan and enjoy a lovely tea party with all of her furry friends.

Nestle Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough, found in the refrigerated section of the grocery store, provides convenient and delicious cookie dough for any occasion. Having cookie dough already portioned out makes it so easy for little hands to work with.

Making Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes is so simple when using this dough. I found the a seasonal Springtime Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies with pink and yellow chips at my local grocery store.  With such festive colors these cookies are perfect for a tea party or Easter dinner.

To make the Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes, break off two squares of Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough. Firmly press them into a mini bundt cake pan or muffin tin.

Making Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

 

Making Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

 

Making Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

Bake the cookies at 350° F for 18 – 20 minutes, or until the cookies are browned and baked through.

Garnish with powdered sugar if desired.

 

Tea Party with Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes!

 

Tea Party with Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes!

Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Tea Cakes

 

 This post contains is a sponsored post. I may receive compensation in the form of monetary compensation or product compensation in exchange for my review. I take pride in reviewing only products that fit my brand and will be beneficial to my readers. And while this post is sponsored all the opinions are my own.

S’Mores Martini

S'Mores Martini | Black Girl Chef's Whites

S’Mores Martini you say? Have I lost my mind, you say?

As much as I would love to tell you I came up with the idea for this fantastic cocktail, it is the brainchild of one of my favorite QVC hosts David Venable. In his latest cookbook Back Around the Table: An “In the Kitchen with David” Cookbook from QVC’s Resident Foodie. This is his second book, almost guaranteed to be a bestseller like his first book.

Back Around the Table Cover

In October 2012, he released his first cookbook, In the Kitchen with David: Comfort Foods That Take You Home, which contains 150 hearty, easy-to-make recipes designed with the home cook in mind. It was the third best-selling cookbook of 2012. This new book is chock full of recipes for tasty treats, including Banana-Peanut Butter French Toast, Sunday Pot Roast, Smoked Brisket, Five-Cheese Fifteen-Minute Mac’ n’ Cheese, and Mimi’s Blackberry Cobbler–can be found in his second comfort food cookbook. QVC’s resident foodie shows you how to transform recipes you know and love into exciting new dishes that still remind you of home.

I actually have a few appliances in my kitchen that I bought from QVC, probably while watching David Venable on In the Kitchen with David. My pressure cooker and huge 18 quart roaster oven are wonderful appliances. I’ve cooked my 20 pound Thanksgiving turkey in that roaster oven, because not only does it come out so tender and juicy I pulled the leg off just trying to pick it up but also because it leaves your oven free for all the side dishes. You can’t beat that.

I’ve been a QVC shopper for so long I can’t remember. I cannot tell you how many times I was wearing an outfit or a beautiful piece of jewelry, and had someone approach to ask where I got it. I would always proudly say QVC! My friends would laugh at me because I said QVC so often! Whatever, I know where to buy the good stuff.

I chose to make this cocktail from the book, even though there are so many other recipes that sounded delicious. The Smoked Gouda, Bacon and Pea Risotto is calling my name, as is the Asian Pulled Pork. Both recipes are for the pressure cooker, which I happen to have, because I bought it on QVC!

A S’Mores Martini is like drinking adult chocolate milk. It is is sweet and smooth and oh so tasty. Too tasty, because I sucked one down in mere moments. Then I just sat there giggling for a bit. Lesson learned.

S'Mores Martini | Black Girl Chef's Whites

 

S'Mores Martini
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 2 Martinis
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup chocolate syrup
  • 2 graham crackers, finely crushed
  • 2 marshmallows
  • ¼ cup marshmallow vodka
  • ¼ cup Adult Chocolate Milk
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
Instructions
  1. Put 3 tablespoons of the chocolate syrup on a small plate.
  2. Place the crushed graham crackers on another small plate.
  3. Dip the rims of two martini glasses in the chocolate syrup, then dip the rims into the graham cracker crumbs. Quickly turn the martini glasses right side up and drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon chocolate syrup in a spiral design on the insides of the glasses.
  4. Put the glasses in the freezer for 1 hour to let the chocolate harden.
  5. Remove the glasses from the freezer.
  6. Heat a small nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
  7. Put each marshmallow on the end of a skewer.
  8. Place the skewers in the skillet with a flat side of the marshmallows facing down, until the marshmallows turn golden, about 45 seconds.
  9. Remove the skewered marshmallows from the pan and, using the tines of a fork, push 1 marshmallow into each martini glass.
  10. Fill a cocktail shaker halfway with ice, half of the marshmallow vodka, half of the Adult Chocolate Milk, and half of the cream.
  11. Shake well and strain the mixture into one of the glasses.
  12. Repeat for the second drink.

 

If you think your family will enjoy this recipe, be sure to visit qvc.co/AroundtheTableCookbook to learn more about and purchase Back Around the Table: An “In the Kitchen with David” Cookbook. Filled with 156 great recipes like this, you’re sure to find something that fits your lifestyle and gathers everyone back around the table!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of QVC. The opinions and text are all mine.